Where Is My Food? Brazilian Flower Fly Steals Prey from Carnivorous Sundews in a Newly Discovered Plant-Animal Interaction

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Título: Where Is My Food? Brazilian Flower Fly Steals Prey from Carnivorous Sundews in a Newly Discovered Plant-Animal Interaction
Autor/es: Fleischmann, Andreas | Rivadavia, Fernando | Gonella, Paulo M. | Pérez-Bañón, Celeste | Mengual Sanchis, Ximo | Rojo, Santos
Grupo/s de investigación o GITE: Bionomía, Sistemática e Investigación Aplicada de Insectos Dípteros e Himenópteros
Centro, Departamento o Servicio: Universidad de Alicante. Departamento de Ciencias Ambientales y Recursos Naturales | Universidad de Alicante. Centro Iberoamericano de la Biodiversidad
Palabras clave: Flower fly | Toxomerus basalis | Carnivorous sundews | Drosera | Plant-animal interaction
Área/s de conocimiento: Zoología
Fecha de publicación: 4-may-2016
Editor: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Cita bibliográfica: Fleischmann A, Rivadavia F, Gonella PM, Pérez-Bañón C, Mengual X, Rojo S (2016) Where Is My Food? Brazilian Flower Fly Steals Prey from Carnivorous Sundews in a Newly Discovered Plant-Animal Interaction. PLoS ONE 11(5): e0153900. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0153900
Resumen: A new interaction between insects and carnivorous plants is reported from Brazil. Larvae of the predatory flower fly Toxomerus basalis (Diptera: Syrphidae: Syrphinae) have been found scavenging on the sticky leaves of several carnivorous sundew species (Drosera, Droseraceae) in Minas Gerais and São Paulo states, SE Brazil. This syrphid apparently spends its whole larval stage feeding on prey trapped by Drosera leaves. The nature of this plant-animal relationship is discussed, as well as the Drosera species involved, and locations where T. basalis was observed. 180 years after the discovery of this flower fly species, its biology now has been revealed. This is (1) the first record of kleptoparasitism in the Syrphidae, (2) a new larval feeding mode for this family, and (3) the first report of a dipteran that shows a kleptoparasitic relationship with a carnivorous plant with adhesive flypaper traps. The first descriptions of the third instar larva and puparium of T. basalis based on Scanning Electron Microscope analysis are provided.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10045/54855
ISSN: 1932-6203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0153900
Idioma: eng
Tipo: info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Derechos: © 2016 Fleischmann et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Revisión científica: si
Versión del editor: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0153900
Aparece en las colecciones:INV - IBAI-DH - Artículos Científicos / Scientific Papers

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