Welfare state regimes and gender inequalities in the exposure to work-related psychosocial hazards

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10045/40517
Información del item - Informació de l'item - Item information
Title: Welfare state regimes and gender inequalities in the exposure to work-related psychosocial hazards
Authors: Campos Serna, Javier | Ronda-Pérez, Elena | Moen, Bente E. | Artazcoz, Lucía | García Benavides, Fernando
Research Group/s: Salud Pública
Center, Department or Service: Universidad de Alicante. Departamento de Enfermería Comunitaria, Medicina Preventiva y Salud Pública e Historia de la Ciencia
Keywords: Gender | Psychosocial work factors | Social welfare | Socioeconomic factors
Knowledge Area: Medicina Preventiva y Salud Pública
Issue Date: 2013
Publisher: Maney Publishing
Citation: International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health. 2013, 19(3): 179-195. doi:10.1179/2049396713Y.0000000030
Abstract: Background: Gender inequalities in the exposure to work-related psychosocial hazards are well established. However, little is known about how welfare state regimes influence these inequalities. Objectives: To examine the relationship between welfare state regimes and gender inequalities in the exposure to work-related psychosocial hazards in Europe, considering occupational social class. Methods: We used a sample of 27, 465 workers from 28 European countries. Dependent variables were high strain, iso-strain, and effort-reward imbalance, and the independent was gender. We calculated the prevalence and prevalence ratio separately for each welfare state regime and occupational social class, using multivariate logistic regression models. Results: More female than male managers/professionals were exposed to: high strain, iso-strain, and effort–reward imbalance in Scandinavian [adjusted prevalence ratio (aPR) = 2·26; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1·87–2·75; 2·12: 1·72–2·61; 1·41: 1·15–1·74; respectively] and Continental regimes (1·43: 1·23–1·54; 1·51: 1·23–1·84; 1·40: 1·17–1·67); and to high strain and iso-strain in Anglo-Saxon (1·92: 1·40–2·63; 1·85: 1·30–2·64; respectively), Southern (1·43: 1·14–1·79; 1·60: 1·18–2·18), and Eastern regimes (1·56: 1·35–1·81; 1·53: 1·28–1·83). Conclusion: Gender inequalities in the exposure to work-related psychosocial hazards were not lower in those welfare state regimes with higher levels of universal social protection policies.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10045/40517
ISSN: 1077-3525 (Print) | 2049-3967 (Online)
DOI: 10.1179/2049396713Y.0000000030
Language: eng
Type: info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights: © W. S. Maney & Son Ltd 2013
Peer Review: si
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/2049396713Y.0000000030
Appears in Collections:INV - SP - Artículos de Revistas

Files in This Item:
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Thumbnail2013_Campos_etal_IJOEH_final.pdfVersión final (acceso restringido)181,12 kBAdobe PDFOpen    Request a copy


Items in RUA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.