The Art of Childbirth of the Midwives of Al-Andalus: Social Assessment and Legal Implication of Health Assistance in the Cultural Diversity of the 10th–14th Centuries

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Title: The Art of Childbirth of the Midwives of Al-Andalus: Social Assessment and Legal Implication of Health Assistance in the Cultural Diversity of the 10th–14th Centuries
Authors: Espina Jerez, Blanca | Aguiar-Frías, Ana María | Siles González, José | Cunha-Oliveira, Aliete | Gómez Cantarino, Sagrario
Research Group/s: Enfermería y Cultura de los Cuidados (EYCC)
Center, Department or Service: Universidad de Alicante. Departamento de Enfermería
Keywords: History of nursing | Midwifery | Women physicians | Gender | Cultural diversity | Transcultural nursing | Health | Sexuality
Issue Date: 27-Oct-2023
Publisher: MDPI
Citation: Espina-Jerez B, Aguiar-Frías AM, Siles-González J, Cunha-Oliveira A, Gómez-Cantarino S. The Art of Childbirth of the Midwives of Al-Andalus: Social Assessment and Legal Implication of Health Assistance in the Cultural Diversity of the 10th–14th Centuries. Healthcare. 2023; 11(21):2835. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11212835
Abstract: (1) Background: The role of Al-Andalus’s women were the result of Arabization and Islamization in Spain. The 10th to the 14th centuries were a time of significant cultural diversity in the region. Female physicians and midwives were important for providing care to women. Despite existing studies, there is still a lack of focused research on the professionalization of these trades, including their requirements, intervention areas, and treatments. (2) Methods: To address this gap, we conducted a scoping review using the dialectical structural model of care (DSMC). Primary medical and legislative sources were used. (3) Results: two kinds of midwife, or qābila, were discovered, along with a woman physician, or ṭabība, who also acted as a midwife. These professions underwent diverse training and fulfilled duties as obstetricians and pediatricians. Midwives were esteemed members of society and were the sole female professionals who needed qualified training. Their performance in the courts was exemplary. Tools for facilitating childbirth and interventions related to female health were discovered in the study. (4) Conclusions: The patriarchal societies suffer from significant inequality in terms of academic training, knowledge transmission, and healthcare provision. Midwives functioned in segregated domestic and legal spaces and were responsible for providing public care to communities from the 10th to 14th centuries.
Sponsor: This work is financed by ENDOCU research group, through resolution 31 March 2023 UCLM aid for research projects co-financed by FEDER, reference 2023-GRIN-34481.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10045/138262
ISSN: 2227-9032
DOI: 10.3390/healthcare11212835
Language: eng
Type: info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights: © 2023 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Peer Review: si
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11212835
Appears in Collections:INV - EYCC - Artículos de Revistas

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