Accuracy of Jump-Mat Systems for Measuring Jump Height

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Título: Accuracy of Jump-Mat Systems for Measuring Jump Height
Autor/es: Pueo, Basilio | Lipinska, Patrycja | Jimenez-Olmedo, Jose Manuel | Zmijewski, Piotr | Hopkins, Will G.
Grupo/s de investigación o GITE: Research in Physical Education, Fitness and Performance (RIPEFAP)
Centro, Departamento o Servicio: Universidad de Alicante. Departamento de Didáctica General y Didácticas Específicas
Palabras clave: Motion capture | Contact mat | Jump performance | Reliability | Open-source technology | Modeling
Área/s de conocimiento: Educación Física y Deportiva
Fecha de publicación: ago-2017
Editor: Human Kinetics
Cita bibliográfica: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance. 2017, 12(7): 959-963. doi:10.1123/ijspp.2016-0511
Resumen: Vertical-jump tests are commonly used to evaluate lower-limb power of athletes and nonathletes. Several types of equipment are available for this purpose. Purpose: To compare the error of measurement of 2 jump-mat systems (Chronojump-Boscosystem and Globus Ergo Tester) with that of a motion-capture system as a criterion and to determine the modifying effect of foot length on jump height. Methods: Thirty-one young adult men alternated 4 countermovement jumps with 4 squat jumps. Mean jump height and standard deviations representing technical error of measurement arising from each device and variability arising from the subjects themselves were estimated with a novel mixed model and evaluated via standardization and magnitude-based inference. Results: The jump-mat systems produced nearly identical measures of jump height (differences in means and in technical errors of measurement ≤1 mm). Countermovement and squat-jump height were both 13.6 cm higher with motion capture (90% confidence limits ±0.3 cm), but this very large difference was reduced to small unclear differences when adjusted to a foot length of zero. Variability in countermovement and squat-jump height arising from the subjects was small (1.1 and 1.5 cm, respectively, 90% confidence limits ±0.3 cm); technical error of motion capture was similar in magnitude (1.7 and 1.6 cm, ±0.3 and ±0.4 cm), and that of the jump mats was similar or smaller (1.2 and 0.3 cm, ±0.5 and ±0.9 cm). Conclusions: The jump-mat systems provide trustworthy measurements for monitoring changes in jump height. Foot length can explain the substantially higher jump height observed with motion capture.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10045/72038
ISSN: 1555-0265 (Print) | 1555-0273 (Online)
DOI: 10.1123/ijspp.2016-0511
Idioma: eng
Tipo: info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Derechos: © 2016 Human Kinetics, Inc.
Revisión científica: si
Versión del editor: http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2016-0511
Aparece en las colecciones:INV - RIPEFAP - Artículos de Revistas

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