Intended or Unintended Doping? A Review of the Presence of Doping Substances in Dietary Supplements Used in Sports

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Title: Intended or Unintended Doping? A Review of the Presence of Doping Substances in Dietary Supplements Used in Sports
Authors: Martínez Sanz, José Miguel | Sospedra, Isabel | Mañas Ortiz, Christian | Baladia, Eduard | Gil-Izquierdo, Ángel | Ortiz-Moncada, Rocío
Research Group/s: Grupo de Investigación en Alimentación y Nutrición (ALINUT) | Salud Pública
Center, Department or Service: Universidad de Alicante. Departamento de Enfermería | Universidad de Alicante. Departamento de Enfermería Comunitaria, Medicina Preventiva y Salud Pública e Historia de la Ciencia
Keywords: Dietary supplements | Doping | Ergonutritional aids | WADA
Knowledge Area: Enfermería | Medicina Preventiva y Salud Pública
Issue Date: 4-Oct-2017
Publisher: MDPI
Citation: Martínez-Sanz JM, Sospedra I, Ortiz CM, Baladía E, Gil-Izquierdo A, Ortiz-Moncada R. Intended or Unintended Doping? A Review of the Presence of Doping Substances in Dietary Supplements Used in Sports. Nutrients. 2017; 9(10):1093. doi:10.3390/nu9101093
Abstract: Introduction: The use of dietary supplements is increasing among athletes, year after year. Related to the high rates of use, unintentional doping occurs. Unintentional doping refers to positive anti-doping tests due to the use of any supplement containing unlisted substances banned by anti-doping regulations and organizations, such as the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). The objective of this review is to summarize the presence of unlabeled doping substances in dietary supplements that are used in sports. Methodology: A review of substances/metabolites/markers banned by WADA in ergonutritional supplements was completed using PubMed. The inclusion criteria were studies published up until September 2017, which analyzed the content of substances, metabolites and markers banned by WADA. Results: 446 studies were identified, 23 of which fulfilled all the inclusion criteria. In most of the studies, the purpose was to identify doping substances in dietary supplements. Discussion: Substances prohibited by WADA were found in most of the supplements analyzed in this review. Some of them were prohormones and/or stimulants. With rates of contamination between 12 and 58%, non-intentional doping is a point to take into account before establishing a supplementation program. Athletes and coaches must be aware of the problems related to the use of any contaminated supplement and should pay special attention before choosing a supplement, informing themselves fully and confirming the guarantees offered by the supplement.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10045/69896
ISSN: 2072-6643
DOI: 10.3390/nu9101093
Language: eng
Type: info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights: © 2017 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Peer Review: si
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu9101093
Appears in Collections:INV - SP - Artículos de Revistas
INV - ALINUT - Artículos de Revistas

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