Comparison of “Live High-Train Low” in Normobaric versus Hypobaric Hypoxia

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Title: Comparison of “Live High-Train Low” in Normobaric versus Hypobaric Hypoxia
Authors: Saugy, Jonas J. | Schmitt, Laurent | Cejuela Anta, Roberto | Faiss, Raphael | Hauser, Anna | Wehrlin, Jon P. | Rudaz, Benjamin | Delessert, Audric | Robinson, Neil | Millet, Grégoire P.
Research Group/s: Grupo de Investigación en Ciencias de la Actividad Física y el Deporte (GICAFD)
Center, Department or Service: Universidad de Alicante. Departamento de Didáctica General y Didácticas Específicas
Keywords: Live High-Train Low | Normobaric hypoxia | Hypobaric hypoxia
Knowledge Area: Educación Física y Deportiva
Issue Date: 17-Dec-2014
Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Citation: Saugy JJ, Schmitt L, Cejuela R, Faiss R, Hauser A, et al. (2014) Comparison of “Live High-Train Low” in Normobaric versus Hypobaric Hypoxia. PLoS ONE 9(12): e114418. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0114418
Abstract: We investigated the changes in both performance and selected physiological parameters following a Live High-Train Low (LHTL) altitude camp in either normobaric hypoxia (NH) or hypobaric hypoxia (HH) replicating current “real” practices of endurance athletes. Well-trained triathletes were split into two groups (NH, n = 14 and HH, n = 13) and completed an 18-d LHTL camp during which they trained at 1100–1200 m and resided at an altitude of 2250 m (PiO2 = 121.7±1.2 vs. 121.4±0.9 mmHg) under either NH (hypoxic chamber; FiO2 15.8±0.8%) or HH (real altitude; barometric pressure 580±23 mmHg) conditions. Oxygen saturations (SpO2) were recorded continuously daily overnight. PiO2 and training loads were matched daily. Before (Pre-) and 1 day after (Post-) LHTL, blood samples, VO2max, and total haemoglobin mass (Hbmass) were measured. A 3-km running test was performed near sea level twice before, and 1, 7, and 21 days following LHTL. During LHTL, hypoxic exposure was lower for the NH group than for the HH group (220 vs. 300 h; P<0.001). Night SpO2 was higher (92.1±0.3 vs. 90.9±0.3%, P<0.001), and breathing frequency was lower in the NH group compared with the HH group (13.9±2.1 vs. 15.5±1.5 breath.min−1, P<0.05). Immediately following LHTL, similar increases in VO2max (6.1±6.8 vs. 5.2±4.8%) and Hbmass (2.6±1.9 vs. 3.4±2.1%) were observed in NH and HH groups, respectively, while 3-km performance was not improved. However, 21 days following the LHTL intervention, 3-km run time was significantly faster in the HH (3.3±3.6%; P<0.05) versus the NH (1.2±2.9%; ns) group. In conclusion, the greater degree of race performance enhancement by day 21 after an 18-d LHTL camp in the HH group was likely induced by a larger hypoxic dose. However, one cannot rule out other factors including differences in sleeping desaturations and breathing patterns, thus suggesting higher hypoxic stimuli in the HH group.
Sponsor: This study was funded by grants from the Ministère des Sports, de la Jeunesse, de l'Education Populaire et de la Vie Associative (MSJEPVA)/Institut National du Sport, de l'Expertise et de la Performance (INSEP) and from Bundes Amt für Sport (BASPO; Switzerland).
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10045/43967
ISSN: 1932-6203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0114418
Language: eng
Type: info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights: © 2014 Saugy et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Peer Review: si
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0114418
Appears in Collections:INV - GICAFD - Artículos de Revistas
INV - RIPEFAP - Artículos de Revistas

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