Could MOOC-Takers’ Behavior Discuss the Meaning of Success-Dropout Rate? Players, Auditors, and Spectators in a Geographical Analysis Course about Natural Risks

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Title: Could MOOC-Takers’ Behavior Discuss the Meaning of Success-Dropout Rate? Players, Auditors, and Spectators in a Geographical Analysis Course about Natural Risks
Authors: Ricart Casadevall, Sandra | Villar Navascués, Rubén Alejandro | Gil-Guirado, Salvador | Hernández-Hernández, María | Rico, Antonio | Olcina, Jorge
Research Group/s: Agua y Territorio | Paisajes y Recursos Naturales en España | Clima y Ordenación del Territorio | Grupo de Investigación en Historia y Clima
Center, Department or Service: Universidad de Alicante. Departamento de Análisis Geográfico Regional y Geografía Física | Universidad de Alicante. Instituto Interuniversitario de Geografía
Keywords: Massive open online courses | eLearning | Behavior | Success | Geography | Natural risks
Knowledge Area: Análisis Geográfico Regional
Issue Date: 15-Jun-2020
Publisher: MDPI
Citation: Ricart S, Villar-Navascués RA, Gil-Guirado S, Hernández-Hernández M, Rico-Amorós AM, Olcina-Cantos J. Could MOOC-Takers’ Behavior Discuss the Meaning of Success-Dropout Rate? Players, Auditors, and Spectators in a Geographical Analysis Course about Natural Risks. Sustainability. 2020; 12(12):4878. doi:10.3390/su12124878
Abstract: Research interest in massive online and open courses (MOOCs) is rapidly growing, questioning who enrolls, why and how to conceive engagement, and success rates. This study is focused on MOOC-takers behavior obtained from a seven-week MOOC experience on natural risks. Data scraping principles have been used to collect data. Demographics, success-dropout rates, engagement periods, achievement and scoring, and behavior were analyzed through descriptive statistics, non-parametric correlation analysis, and statistical hypothesis testing. The results show that students who start earlier and those who finish earlier the course obtain better grades in some of the modules (motivation and background on natural risks could be the explanation). However, for ‘last moment students’, speed in passing the modules is either related to greater motivation, although in this case it is not related to better grades. Furthermore, students who complete tasks during the weekend take less time to complete the modules and obtain a better grade. In addition, a learning strategy is promoted by reconsidering who is learning: players (those who complete the course and earning a certificate), auditors (those who have completed a thematic unit or the whole module, earning partial knowledge), and spectators (those enrolled until the end of the course, who intend earning experience in e-learning).
Sponsor: This research was funded by the Vice-Rector’s Office for Quality and Educational Innovation of the University of Alicante, grant number E8791, BOUA 07/11/2018, of the PENSEM-ONLINE Program.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10045/107384
ISSN: 2071-1050
DOI: 10.3390/su12124878
Language: eng
Type: info:eu-repo/semantics/article
Rights: © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Peer Review: si
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.3390/su12124878
Appears in Collections:INV - Agua y Territorio - Artículos de Revistas
INV - Paisajes y Recursos Naturales en España - Artículos de Revistas
INV - CyOT - Artículos de Revistas
INV - HYC - Artículos de Revistas

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